Pickling Books

Although we try to chronicle as many pickling recipes as possible on this site it is always good to have nice a pickling book with recipes that you can refer to in the kitchen. Exposing yourself to multiple recipes is a great way to get a feeling for what flavor do well together and over time can inspire you to create your own recipes. We have compiled some of our favorite recipe books in the section below:

 

Pickling books

Pickling Books:

The Joy of Pickling: 250 Flavor-Packed Recipes for Vegetables and More from Garden or Market.

This  recipe book, as the name implies, has a veritable library of pickling recipes to choose from. Everything from Moroccan pickled lemons to soy sauce pickles this book covers it all. The author, Linda Ziedrech, is a homesteader is rural Oregon and her love for preserving and creating with the vegetables she grows really shines through in this book. She breaks down all 250 recipes in easy to follow instructions that make pickling a breeze. This is a great book and for only $14 dollar turns out to be a great value too.

The Joy of Pickling: 250 Flavor-Packed Recipes for Vegetables and More from Garden or Market.

What people are saying:

“Here in New England late summer harvest is in full swing so The Joy of Pickling, Revised Edition: 250 Flavor-Packed Flavor-Packed Recipes arrived last week right on time to be put to good use. And put to use it has certainly been – with luscious results.

One thing our Grandmas knew was that pickles sparked up dull winter fare like nothing else could, so much so that our Pennsylvania Dutch Grandmas were famous for serving “seven sweets and seven sours” on their dinner tables! What they might not have known is that pickles are good for you, loaded with Vitamin C, and sometimes the B vitamins. Now, if you’re looking for 101 varieties of pickles like your Grandma and her Grandma used to make by the bushel, then there are better – or at least more extensive – books to be had and you’ll find a multitude of recipes for them in just about every general American cookbook to boot.

However, if what you are looking for is the unusual, then send The Joy of Pickling straight to the head of the class. Whether you are looking for Polish Pickled Mushrooms (big jar sitting in the fridge) or Korean style Pickled Garlic (Mrs. Kim’s – sitting on the counter) or the Pickled Limes featured in Little Women, you’ll find the recipe here.”

 


 

pickling booksFermented Vegetables: Creative Recipes for Fermenting 64 Vegetables & Herbs in Krauts, Kimchis, Brined Pickles, Chutneys, Relishes & Pastes

If you are opposed to using a vinegar based pickling brine and prefer a more natural, Paleo friendly method of pickling, than this may be a good book to check out. Wife and husband, Kristen and Christopher Schockey, have compiled 64 interesting recipes that use the fermenting process to uniquely transform your vegetables. It covers the classics like kimchi and sauerkraut to the lesser known like pickled green coriander, (a personal favorite). This book is a great introduction into the somewhat exotic world of fermentation.

 Fermented Vegetables: Creative Recipes for Fermenting 64 Vegetables & Herbs in Krauts, Kimchis, Brined Pickles, Chutneys, Relishes & Pastes

What others are saying:

“I’m not exactly new to fermenting, but I was stuck – doing the same, comfortable fermentations – until I got this book. It is so easy to understand, so simple to find a recipe for whatever veggie you are currently harvesting, and so inspirational in the combinations of spices and veggies that I found myself immediately looking for more crocks! I got started right away with the Thai-inspired Baby Pak Choi recipe and after finding some giant beets hiding under the cucumber leaves, the Curried Golden Beets. All so yummy!

I can see spending the entire next harvest season experimenting my way through the recipes, and then enjoying one of the cocktails at the end of the day. A great book and refreshing addition to my fermentation library!”


                               
Pickling books

Asian Pickles: Sweet, Sour, Salty, Cured,  and Fermented Preserves from Korea, Japan, China, India, and Beyond

This pickling book brings it back to where it all started, Southeastern Asia. If you have always been a fan of those cool side dishes that are usually ubiquitous at Asian restaurants, especially Korean, than you will want to check out Karen Solomon’s Asian Pickles. This is an absolute gem of a book and is a great way to expand your pickling knowledge base. The author does a really great job boiling done centuries of pickling tradition into 208 wisdom filled pages chuck full of interesting recipes. If you love pickling but are tired of the traditional staples than I can not recommend this book enough.

 Asian Pickles: Sweet, Sour, Salty, Cured,  and Fermented Preserves from Korea, Japan, China, India, and Beyond

What people are saying: 

“Asian Pickles: Sweet, Sour, Salty, Cured,  and Fermented Preserves from Korea, Japan, China, India, and Beyond by Karen Solomon is much more than a cookbook as there’s much trivia included and humor too! It’s a very enjoyable read!

A few months ago, my boss shared some yellow squash and zucchini from his garden that he had pickled. They were too delicious for words! I resolved right there and then to delve into pickling myself and was thrilled to find this book offered for review at Net Galley. I’ve now read it and tried some of the recipes and am HOOKED!

First, I’m thrilled to share that the recipes include NO preservatives, artificial colors or flavorings, and other nasties. The book is segregated by geographical area: Japan, Korea, China, India and Southeast Asia. Each area includes an introduction where the author describes her experience and thoughts on the pickling offerings there along with basic regional styles and preparation and serving tips. One example of valuable tips is in working with garlic where the author shares how to best peel it via an online video and how to remove garlic smell from your hands utilizing a piece of metal. Neither were tips I’d ever heard previously! Another great tip was how to crack cardamom pods to make cardamom tea. AND still another that I found useful was how to shave fresh coconut.”